Category Archives: Israel

Toward a Tel Aviv S-Bahn

I have been thinking of alternatives to the current plan for a Tel Aviv Subway for several years now; last year I expounded on some principles for a better plan. As I mentioned last year, Tel Aviv’s subway system should … Continue reading

Posted in Israel, Regional Rail, Transportation, Urban Transit | 23 Comments

The NITBY Problem

Usually, the barrier to new development in a neighborhood is NIMBYism: connected local community members do not want the project, saying “not in my backyard.” There’s a wealth of literature about NIMBYs’ role in restrictions on development; William Fischel’s work … Continue reading

Posted in Development, Israel, Politics and Society, Urbanism | 27 Comments

The Difference Between Bus and Subway Alignments

Reading design guidelines for bus routes reminds me of how different surface transit is from rapid transit. Buses need to follow straight, wide, two-way roads. Subway trains do not: those roads make construction easier, but it’s normal for train lines … Continue reading

Posted in Israel, Transportation, Urban Transit | 16 Comments

Tel Aviv Needs a Subway, Done Right

After decades of false starts, Tel Aviv is finally building a subway-surface line. The political opinions of activists and urban planners in Israel are divided between supporters, who believe the line is long overdue, and opponents, who instead believe buses … Continue reading

Posted in Israel, Politics and Society, Regional Rail, Transportation, Urban Transit | 31 Comments

Spreading Population Around

There was a series of hate marches and anti-immigrant riots in Israel last week, continuing intermittently to today; at heart was incitement against Sudanese and Eritrean refugees, who the government labels infiltrators and work migrants. Politicians from the center rightward … Continue reading

Posted in Israel, Politics and Society, Urbanism | 13 Comments

One-Way Pairs: the Bad and the Ugly

One of Jane Jacobs’ prescient observations about bus service in The Death and Life is that one-way pairs, as practiced on the avenues in Manhattan, are bad for riders. Her argument was that one-way pairs require people to walk too … Continue reading

Posted in Incompetence, Israel, New York, Transportation, Urban Transit | 21 Comments

Democratic Versus Elite Consensus

This is part 2 of my series on consensus, following Consensus and Cities. Early-20th century America was a nation with remarkable consensus about cities. The progressive reformers, the populists, and the environmental movement all agreed that cities were bad, and … Continue reading

Posted in Consensus, Israel, Politics and Society | 10 Comments